First Impressions of Faces | connections (2023)

Table of Contents
introduction example Heuristics and first impressions In summary... When we are exposed to a face, we quickly form our first impression of it. We would create these first impressions automatically, without being aware of it, and we could not prevent them. Also, they would be particularly accessible, that is, we can access them without having to face any cognitive effort. They could then be used as heuristics to answer complex questions. What determines the first impression? social background In summary... These first elements of explanation allow us to understand the social origin of first impressions: the information we extract from faces guides our actions during social interactions. More precisely, the interpretation of information derived from faces allows us to attribute certain characteristics to others (e.g. intentions, emotions, but also the type of relationship maintained). The importance of this information can be innate, but also acquired throughout our lives and according to our social goals [8]. perceptual origins Accuracy of social attributes of faces In summary... Our first impressions are particularly accessible during heuristic judgment, and we tend to rely on them to form judgments. The formation of our first impressions has social and perceptual causes: when exposed to impoverished information, we generalize our knowledge (e.g., our knowledge of faces expressing emotion) to people with similar facial features. In addition, certain perceptual determinants, more specifically certain facial configurations, produce certain impressions (e.g. dominance and reliability). Finally, the judgments we make based on our first impressions are unreliable, even biased. Social consequences of judging faces On the plus side, first impressions have less of an impact on the judgments of experienced professionals than novices [18]. This last point allows us to qualify the impact of first impressions on our daily lives. In fact, whether for healthcare professionals or voters, it seems that experience lessens the impact of first impressions. If we take the example of elections, it seems that people with political knowledge are less likely to be influenced by their first visual impression [5]. Conclusion ​ references​ The author​ FAQs Videos

introduction

This column explores the tendency to judge a person based on their facial features based on our first impressions. It aims to define these first impressions of a face and how they can influence our judgement.


In psychological research, “first impressions of faces” refers to characteristics (e.g., personality traits) that we attribute to someone based on looking at their face. When we see a new face, we all make first impressions and tend to assume they are true, albeit unconsciously.

example

You decide to take part in a study in which you are asked to guess a person's occupation based on a photo. The research team presents the following picture (Figure 1).

First Impressions of Faces | connections (1)

From the list, what do you think this person's job is?

  • Bauer

  • luthier

  • Carpenter

  • physician

  • salesperson

  • president

  • university professor

Figure 1 Todorov's face displayed during the experiment (2017).

Based on this person's clothing, you may have ruled out the answers "farmer," "violin maker," "carpenter," even "salesman," and concluded that this gentleman likely belongs to a qualified professional group with a college degree. You probably also relied on looking at that person's face to formulate your answer [1, 2].

In addition to the question asked, it is likely that when you see this face you have a special impression of this man: you may have thought that he looked, for example, strict, strict or competent [2, 3].


Maybe you recognized this face? This is President Warren Harding, 29th President of the United States. At that time (1920s) physiognomy - the study of faces to determine a person's character - was fashionable and practiced by physiognomists. The physiognomists of the time described Harding as a man of wit and scientific intellect. It was predicted back then that he would become the best President the United States had ever had. Even today, historians consider him one of the worst presidents of the United States: debauchery, corruption, scandals... [2].


This example makes it clear that when we perceive a face, we tend to generate impressions from it: we assign properties and characteristics (e.g. personality traits) to a person based on their facial features. In addition, the example shows that we use these impressions to make judgments (e.g. "He seems competent, strict, so he must have a job that involves heavy responsibility").

Heuristics and first impressions

President Harding's example shows how we use faceprints to answer complex questions. To answer these questions, we use a heuristic. A heuristic can be defined as a "shortcut" used to answer a complex question. Regarding President Harding's photo, we do not have enough information to provide a definitive answer as to his occupation. So, to answer the question, we'll use the elements we have: your clothes and the impression your face creates. This example shows us how heuristics allow us to form judgments based only on immediately accessible information.

In fact, information is likely to be used in heuristics when it is directly accessible in our environment or in our memory. So when we use heuristics, we are likely to use this readily available information to form our judgment [4].


Certain types of information are considered to be systematically easily accessible, i.e. H. they are made in such a way that no effort is required to access them. This includes the information we perceive with our senses as well as the information we store in memory [4].


First impression is a particularly accessible category of information [5]. In fact, we generally think it takes 120 milliseconds for the information processed by our brain to reach our consciousness [6]. However, if we examine the time it takes to make a first impression of a face, it takes only 34 milliseconds, suggesting that first impression is not a conscious phenomenon [7]. Furthermore, we cannot prevent the making of those first impressions. This suggests that impression formation is a process that is rapid and automatic. The first impression is therefore a particularly accessible piece of information that we can draw on when forming heuristic judgments.


(Video) First Impressions: Faces and Voices I ARTE.tv Documentary

In summary...

When we are exposed to a face, we quickly form our first impression of it. We would create these first impressions automatically, without being aware of it, and we could not prevent them. Also, they would be particularly accessible, that is, we can access them without having to face any cognitive effort. They could then be used as heuristics to answer complex questions.

What determines the first impression?

Do facial features really reveal a person's personality? This belief has permeated history: from Aristotle to the physiognomists of the 18th century [2].

Faces, and particularly the information they convey, caught the attention of early psychological research, both in recognizing emotions and inferring personality traits. Today, research has moved away from the notion that the face reflects a person's inner characteristics in addition to emotions. Assuming that faces do not reflect personality, research has focused on the mechanisms that lead to the formulation of our judgments based on facial features. We are talking about impression formation here [5, 8].

In the following sections we discuss the social and perceptual origins of the first visual impression. The first impression of faces is both a perceptual phenomenon (i.e. produced by our senses) and a social phenomenon, since their meaning and influence are partly learned and shared in social groups.

social background

Some theories of perception assume that we perceive in order to act [8]. Thus, our cognition would not only transcribe the outside world, but also allow us to identify specific information used to generate an action. Some researchers study perceptions of the social world. These researchers are specifically interested in information about a person's appearance, the way they speak, etc. that convey their intentions or their emotions, but also qualify the relationship we have with them (e.g. friendship, family, professional relationship, etc.). In this perspective, the faces would convey information that would guide action (e.g., we perceive a frightened face and are therefore alert). Although we are only discussing the perception of facial features here, it is important to note that faces are not the only possible source of information guiding our actions during social interaction.

When we perceive a face, we can distinguish different types of information that tell us something about the person and the situation (e.g. age group, membership of a population group or emotional expression) [6]. This ability to recognize and interpret information from a face can be innate, but is also acquired throughout life. For example, children are particularly sensitive to the faces of adults, while adolescents and adults are more sensitive to the faces of their peers [9]. Especially from adolescence, information for recognizing peers is in the foreground, while with children the recognition of reference persons (e.g. parent figures) is in the foreground. Because children are still very dependent on their caregivers, this prioritization of information would be adaptive: in the event of a problem, the child likely needs an adult. Rapid identification of an adult is therefore a priority. This adult face sensitivity can save the child time, which is crucial in dangerous situations. However, from puberty onward, children become empowered and tend to trust their age group more than their caregivers. Developing greater sensitivity to the faces of peers is associated with a greater propensity to find and identify people to trust, form loyal friendships with, and future love partners

Thus, during an interaction, the face can provide information that helps us understand the context of our interlocutor and facilitate communication. In summary, the information we extract and interpret from the face can depend on our age (e.g. baby versus teenager) but also on our social goals (e.g. neediness) [8].

This sensitivity to certain facial expressions can lead to misperceptions when the information we are exposed to is incomplete or tenuous. Indeed, we can encounter situations where the information available in the area is partial or incomplete, but where we want to make a specific judgment. For example, you notice that your friend looks sad. However, you have no information other than your facial expression to justify your impression. You are then in a situation where your information for the assessment is incomplete. We then speak of impoverished information [6].

The occurrence and maintenance of faceprints in low-information contexts can be explained adaptively: when you see someone running toward you in fear, you tend to be wary. If nothing happens, your reaction will have no consequences. However, when something happens, it takes you less time to react than if you hadn't considered your impression. From this perspective, it is beneficial (i.e., adaptive) to make quick judgments even when the information is incomplete, since the consequences of failing to make judgments about a dangerous situation can be catastrophic, even fatal.

(Video) About Face: How First Impressions Fool Us

However, situations where information is exhausted can lead to biased perceptions. Information that is normally correctly perceived by faces can lead to an overgeneralization phenomenon. For example: The modulation of our behavior in relation to a baby is adaptive, that is, when faced with a baby we tend to take a protective stance to inhibit our aggressiveness. This modulation is adaptive because it promotes the good development of the child (and, more generally, its survival). In order to modulate our behavior, however, we must be able to recognize the information that indicates we are dealing with a baby. Among other things, the face enables this recognition [1]. The perception of certain important information about the babies' faces, such as large eyes, facial proportions or the shape of the head, would trigger protective behavior and inhibition of aggression. It is said that the reaction evoked by babies' faces is so strong that it can also occur when some of this information is perceived on the faces of adults. This is the phenomenon of overgeneralization, as the impression made by traits is generalized from infants to adults. Thus, an adult face that has baby-like features might evoke the perception of a more vulnerable or submissive person, as is the case when we perceive a baby's face.

In summary...

These first elements of explanation allow us to understand the social origin of first impressions: the information we extract from faces guides our actions during social interactions. More precisely, the interpretation of information derived from faces allows us to attribute certain characteristics to others (e.g. intentions, emotions, but also the type of relationship maintained). The importance of this information can be innate, but also acquired throughout our lives and according to our social goals [8].

perceptual origins

There is some consistency in our judgments [10], that is, it is assumed that we all generally have the same first impression of a face. This consistency suggests that, in addition to the social meaning of the information we extract from faces, first impressions are also linked to perceptual phenomena. Certain facial configurations would thus systematically produce certain first impressions.

Some researchers have attempted to determine what these facial configurations are. One of the questions that interests her is: Which facial features make the face appear more dominant or reliable? Researchers identified factors that can influence dominance and trustworthiness judgments evoked by the first impression of a face. They found that through different dominance and reliability traits, they could create a specific impression and the intensity of the impression. For example, a square jaw has been shown to create a stronger impression of dominance, so we vary the impression of dominance by varying the shape of the jaw (more or less square) [10].
The print variations we are talking about are called dimensions. Thus, one dimension represents the variations of facial features that determine an impression to vary its intensity.

The figure below shows areas that vary in the reliability dimension. Who would you rather lend your car keys to?

First Impressions of Faces | connections (2)

Figure 2 - Reliability dimension (from least to most reliable). From Oosterhof and Todorov (2011)

Chances are your choice is on the faces on the right.


To build their models, the researchers used computer-generated faces that are emotionally neutral. Neutral faces are constructed from people's facial features when they are not expressing emotion. It's important to note that just because you're not expressing emotion doesn't mean you're not expressing emotion (that's the whole point of facial expressions).
By generating a large number of neutral faces and asking participants to rank them according to the dimension of interest, we can determine which facial features are causing bias in the assessment. Knowing these characteristics, we can take a neutral face and adjust its features to vary the impression it creates. Figure 2 shows this last step.


Thus, the reliability rating would be based primarily on the perception of features resembling emotional utterances. The angrier the face is perceived, the less trustworthy it appears (left face in figure). On the other hand, the more the face is perceived as happy, the more likely it is to be classified as trustworthy (face on the right in the figure) [5]. It would be difficult to make an exhaustive list of facial feature variations. However, it should be noted that the shape of the mouth is not the same for all faces: the more believable the face is perceived, the more the line between the lips appears to be in a “U” shape and vice versa. . This U-shaped line on the trusting face resembles that of a smiling person, so we can tell this face is that of a happy person. This is the phenomenon of overgeneralization of emotional expressions mentioned above: we perceive facial features (e.g. the U-shaped lip line) that resemble emotional expressions (e.g. the lip line of a happy person), then we generalize them as if they were true (i.e. this person is happy).


Now let's take a look at the dominance dimension. Pictured below: who would you hire as a bodyguard?

First Impressions of Faces | connections (3)

Figure 3 – Dominance dimension (from least to most dominant). From Oosterhof and Todorov (2011)

Again, your choice will surely fall squarely in the face.


A mature, male face is perceived as dominant, while a female face with childlike features is perceived as less dominant (left face in the figure) [5]. Dominance is associated with physical strength; the perception of dominance would indicate people's ability to harm us [2].


In addition to dominance and reliability, seven other dimensions have been examined so far: threat, attraction, fear, meanness, extraversion, competence and agreeableness [8].

Accuracy of social attributes of faces

So far we have examined the processes that lead us to formulate our impressions of faces. However, we haven't analyzed the accuracy: are our first impressions reliable?


While we can usually determine obvious information from the data visible in faces (population group, age, etc.), impressions of objectively unidentifiable characteristics are significantly less precise (e.g. personality traits) [5 ]


However, the debate is not fully resolved. Some studies claim that we are able to determine political leanings, sexual orientation, crime, and other internal characteristics from photographs of faces. These studies seem to indicate that faces would reveal features of our inner being. However, these projects have been criticized for their methodology, which often has serious shortcomings [5]. For example, some studies reveal certain factors, such as the clothing of the people in the photos they present. Consequently, participants are exposed to multiple sources of information: face and clothing. However, we know that factors such as clothing would be enough to infer a person's class or political orientation without having to look in the face. So if the participants' assessments are correct, it is not possible to know whether this is caused by faces or clothing. Currently, subject matter experts believe that there is insufficient evidence that facial prints are a reliable source of information for identifying characteristics such as personality traits (eg, trustworthiness, aggressiveness, agreeableness), skill level, politics, or sexual orientation. etc.


We might think that if our first impressions of faces were valid, then we should be able to use them when appropriate [5,11]. For example, imagine a scenario where we are asked to determine the political affiliation of certain people based on a photograph. To do this, we will be informed of the distribution of political orientations in the photos that we will see (90% Democrats vs. 10% Republicans). We should be able to sort at least some of the photos without difficulty: if we know the group is 90% democratic and we always answer "democrat" we should have 90% correct answers. However, such results are very rare. On the contrary, participants in similar studies achieve significantly lower categorization rates than if they had used the fixed response strategy. This suggests that participants rely heavily on their first impressions when making judgments and are misled as a result. Objective information, such as belonging to a certain demographic group (e.g. age group), is relatively accessible in our everyday lives. It provides more reliable information than our first impressions. Therefore, it would be better to neglect our first impressions and focus on more reliable indicators [11].


Additionally, our ability to assess the accuracy of our judgments—called meta-accuracy—seems limited. When we ask participants to categorize faces by occupation and then ask them to rate their own performance, people cannot accurately predict which photos are likely to provide a correct answer [5]. Additionally, participants who were more confident about their overall performance did not perform better than those who were less confident. This low meta-accuracy suggests that we cannot discern the accuracy of our first impressions, even if they lead us to an incorrect judgment [5].

(Video) "Face Value: The Influence of First Impressions" Alexander Todorov, The Lying Conference


Ultimately, even if we could obtain evidence that certain facial features are associated with certain personality traits, the evidence would not necessarily support the existence of a causal relationship between personality and facial morphology [5]. Suppose it has been shown that people who are perceived as dominant are more likely to engage in violent behavior. This would not necessarily indicate a personality trait as his violence could be explained by the behavior of other people in his company. In other words, when we perceive a dominant face, we tend to respond more aggressively to the perceived threat and "force" the person to respond with violence. Thus, the stereotype would be confirmed that the dominant face is associated with violent behavior (this is the notion of self-fulfilling prophecy) [5].


So, as the debate rages on, it seems that we shouldn't rely on our first impressions of facial features to infer people's inner traits. However, it seems that these impressions can have an important impact on our judgments. In the next part we describe the consequences of the first impression of faces in our daily life.

In summary...

Our first impressions are particularly accessible during heuristic judgment, and we tend to rely on them to form judgments. The formation of our first impressions has social and perceptual causes: when exposed to impoverished information, we generalize our knowledge (e.g., our knowledge of faces expressing emotion) to people with similar facial features. In addition, certain perceptual determinants, more specifically certain facial configurations, produce certain impressions (e.g. dominance and reliability). Finally, the judgments we make based on our first impressions are unreliable, even biased.

Social consequences of judging faces

If our first impressions of faces are unreliable, we should question their implications and how much they affect our everyday judgment.


In 2005, Todorov and colleagues [12] tested the hypothesis that first impressions of faces influence social events. To do this, the researchers asked participants who did not know the candidates (two men) to rate the competence of the finalists in the 2002 and 2004 US Senate elections based on their faces. The results are surprising: in 72% of the cases, the most suitable candidate was the current election winner - and this judgment was based only on his face! It is also surprising that the greater the difference in how candidates perceive their competence, the greater the difference between the votes. It is important to emphasize that this study does not address the competency of candidates, but rather the impact of first facial impressions on voters' choices. As such, this study suggests that our first impressions can influence important decisions, such as who elects our political representatives. These results have been reproduced several times and support these conclusions [13].


In addition to election results, many studies have been conducted to understand the consequences of first impressions on faces. Here is a summary of some of their findings:

Military rank correlates with the impression of mastery of the face [14].

People who appear more competent and dominant are more likely to achieve leadership in large companies and receive higher salaries than their peers, even if they do not do better [15].

Participants are less likely to trust people whose faces appear less trustworthy, even if their behavior suggests they are trustworthy [16].

From another perspective with more important consequences, the reliability of a defendant's face influences the decision of the jury responsible for determining his guilt. The impact persists even among participants who advocate the values ​​of equity and justice [17].

Finally, patient face reliability significantly varies the propensity of healthcare professionals to care for these patients [18].

(Video) First Impressions On: Faces Of War


On the plus side, first impressions have less of an impact on the judgments of experienced professionals than novices [18]. This last point allows us to qualify the impact of first impressions on our daily lives. In fact, whether for healthcare professionals or voters, it seems that experience lessens the impact of first impressions. If we take the example of elections, it seems that people with political knowledge are less likely to be influenced by their first visual impression [5].

Conclusion

We all know the saying: "Clothes don't make the man" or "Don't judge a book by its cover". Despite these reservations, however, we cannot resist the temptation to ascribe characteristics to others based on their appearance. First impressions based on facial features prove this.


In this column, we've seen how first impressions of faces can affect our judgment and have consequences in our lives. In particular, we have seen how accessible first impressions of faces are when making heuristic judgments: when we need to answer a complex question (e.g., who should I vote for?), we rely on these impressions to inform our judgments formulate even if they are doubtful. . After all, their consequences can be significant, as we saw above with the example of elections.


It seems important to emphasize that these processes are automatic, unconscious and shared by all. We cannot control them, but we can be aware of their existence. So how do we try to reduce the impact of first sight on our judgment? As discussed above, it appears that specialization reduces bias. Since we are not experts, we can therefore be sure that we base our decisions, as well as our voting behavior, on objective evidence such as political agendas.

references

[1] Zebrowitz, Leslie A. (1998). Read faces windows to the soul. Westview Press.

[2] Todorov, Alexander B. (2017). Name the compelling influence of first impressions worth. Princeton University Press.

[3] Willis, Janine, and Alexander B. Todorov (2006). First impressions. Psychological Science 17 (7), 592-98.

[4] Kahneman, Daniel & Shane Frederick (2002). Representativity revisited: substitution of attributes in intuitive judgment. In Gilovich Thomas & Dale Griffin (eds.). Heuristics and Bias: The Psychology of Intuitive Judgment, 49-81. Cambridge University Press.

[5] Todorov, Alexander, Christopher Y. Olivola, Ron Dotsch, and Peter Mende-Siedlecki (2015). Social attributions of faces: determinants, consequences, accuracy, and functional meaning. Annual Review of Psychology 66(1), 519-545.

[6] Lamme, Victor A. (2010). How neuroscience will change the way we look at consciousness. Cognitive Neuroscience 1(3), 204-220.

[7] Todorov, Alexander, Manish Pakrashi, and Nikolaas N. Oosterhof (2010). Rating faces for reliability in minimal time. Social Cognition 27(6), 813–33.

[8] Zebrowitz, Leslie A. (2011). Ecological and social approaches to facial perception. In Rhodes Gillian, Andy Calder, Mark Johnson and James Haxby (eds.). Oxford Handbook of Face Perception, 1-20. Oxford textbooks online.

[9] Picci, Giorgia & Suzanne Scherf (2016). From caregivers to peers: puberty shapes the perception of the human face. Psychological Science 27(11), 1461-1473.

[10] Oosterhof, N Nikolaas & Alexander Todorov (2008). The functional basis of face scoring. Proceedings of The National Academy of Sciences 105(32), 11087-11092.

[11] Olivola, Christopher Y & Alexander Todorov (2010). Deceived by the first impression? Reviewing the diagnostic value of conclusions based on appearance. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 46(2), 315–24.

[12] Todorov, Alexander, Mandisodza Anesu, Goren Amir, and Crystal C Hall (2005). Face competency inference predicts election outcomes. Science 308 (5728), 1623-1626.

[13] Chen, Fang Fang, Yiming Jing and Jeong Min Lee (2005). This is what a manager looks like: competent and reliable, but not domineering. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 51, 27-33.

[14] Mazur, Allan, Julie Mazur, and Caroline Keating (1984). Attaining Military Rank Through a West Point Class: Effects of Cadet Physical Attributes. American Journal of Sociology 90(1), 125-150.

[15] Graham, John R, Campbell R Harvey, and Manju Puri (2017). A corporate beauty pageant. Management Science 63(9), 3044-3056.

[16] Rezlescu, Constantin, Brad Duchaine, Christopher Y. Olivola and Nick Chater (2012). Infallible face configurations influence strategic decisions in trust games with or without information about past behavior. PLoS ONE 7(3), e34293.

[17] Porter, Stephen, Leanne ten Brinke & Chantal Gustaw (2010). Dangerous Decisions: The Impact of First Impressions of Trustworthiness on Judging Legal Evidence and Defendant Guilt. Psychology, Crime and Law 16(6), 477–491.

[18] Mattarozzi, Katia, Valentina Colonnello, Francesco De Gioia and Alexander Todorov (2017). It is important to me, even after the first impression: assessments based on facial expressions in the context of health. Social Sciences and Medicine 182, 68–72.

The author

Gaëtan Béghin, M.Ps., PhD student. / D.Psy, Laboratory for Thought Processes, University of Quebec in Montreal. Translated by Susan D Renaud.

How to cite this entry

Beghin, G. (2021). First Impressions of Faces, trans. SD Renaud. In E. Gagnon-St-Pierre, C. Gratton & E. Muszynski (Eds.). Shortcuts: a practical guide to cognitive biases. Connected:www.shortcogs.com

FAQs

What is your first impression of someone? ›

What are first impressions? First impressions are the almost-instant conclusions we draw when meeting someone for the first time. We form this opinion by quickly taking in information about a person, including their face, dress, posture, and tone of voice.

Do we automatically form first impressions from faces? ›

First, impressions from faces are fast and automatic. They are elicited by brief exposure, in some cases 100 ms or less (Willis & Todorov, 2006).

What are some examples of impressions? ›

My first impression of him was that he was a kind and thoughtful young man. First impressions are important but can be misleading. In her journal, she recorded her impressions of the city. Her kindness left a lasting impression on her students.

Why is the first impression so important? ›

First Impressions Last

The reason why first impressions are so important is that they last well beyond that moment. This is thanks to something called the primacy effect, which means that when someone experiences something before other things in a sequence, they remember that first thing more.

What are 3 examples of first impressions? ›

A person's appearance, clothes, body language, manners, and the way they talk all contribute to first impressions.

What should I say in a good first impression? ›

Be courteous

Shake the other person's hand firmly, but don't grip too tightly and say “It's nice to meet you” or “Pleased to meet you”. Say it with confidence and a smile, and you've already taken the first step in making that good impression.

How accurate are your first impressions of people? ›

In real life, the 'cover' of people, what they wear, how they look, and their behavior can often misrepresent what they really are. Like the cover of a book, first impressions are not always right, it can be inaccurate, and not as true as what it really is.

Does first impression really matter? ›

In interactions with these and other people, the impressions you make can have a real impact on your academic and professional success. "You don't get a second chance to make a first impression," says James Uleman, PhD, a psychology professor at New York University and researcher on impression management.

How much of your first impression is based on how you look? ›

We have all heard the saying, “You never get a second chance to make a first impression.” Experts say: 55 percent of first impressions are made by what we see (visual). 38 percent is the way we hear your first words (vocal).

What is first impression in a simple words? ›

In psychology, a first impression is the event when one person first encounters another person and forms a mental image of that person. Impression accuracy varies depending on the observer and the target (person, object, scene, etc.) being observed.

How do you make a first impression example? ›

Be Open and Confident

When it comes to making a good first impression, body language can often speak louder than words. Use your body language to project appropriate confidence and self-assurance. Stand tall, smile (of course), make eye contact, greet with a firm handshake.

What is impression in simple words? ›

an idea or opinion of what someone or something is like: It makes a bad impression if you're late for an interview.

What do first impressions say about you? ›

People develop first impressions of you even before you open your mouth. Research suggests that your appearance affects how trustworthy, promiscuous, and powerful people think you are. You can change some people's first impressions of you by changing your behavior and how you present yourself.

Why is it important to have a good impression? ›

It not only makes a person seem better but also enhances their overall personality. It is necessary for every field of life. Good impressions do not vanish easily rather stay for a very long time. They say that a person has something unique and is confident enough.

What is the power of first impression? ›

First impressions are powerful. From the moment we meet people, we start forming judgements about them and these initial impressions influence our response to any new information we learn about them.

Is first impression the best impression? ›

The reason is simple: the first impression is the best impression that one should make. Some even say the first impression is the last impression. Nobody wants to miss out on making a great opening impression as that can often be the decisive factor in determining whether there will be a second meeting or not.

How can first impressions be attractive? ›

Show your interest

Expressing interest and enthusiasm in what someone has to say can help boost your chances of making a good impression.

How do you make a good first impression smile? ›

The way you carry yourself, maintaining good posture and exuding a relaxed and confident attitude, is crucial to making a good first impression. Maintaining eye contact and smiling in a friendly manner are also important parts of positive body language.

How many impressions is enough? ›

The historic answer, from an array of industry experts, is that three impressions are needed before your message is recognized. Why three? The idea originated from an article by Dr. Herbert Krugman — a pioneer in advertising research — published in the 1972 edition of the Journal of Advertising Research.

Should you trust your first impressions? ›

“I would never give anyone a blanket statement that they should trust their first impressions, or not,” says Tufts psychologist Nalini Ambady. “That's too dependent on the person, the context of the first impression, everything.” In other words, be wary of first impressions.

What is a good impression score? ›

If you're using unbranded and relatively unique keywords, it's good to try to have an impression share of at least 90-95%, but for more popular keywords or if you have a limited budget, 60% is a good benchmark.

What is the impact of first impressions? ›

Behavioral scientists call it the first impression bias: a limitation in human information processing that causes us to make quick and incomplete observations about others based on the first piece of information we perceive. First impressions are often very important, as they lead to quick assumptions and judgements.

How first impressions affect our behavior? ›

A study from Princeton University has found that people make judgements on attractiveness, likability and trustworthiness within a fraction of a second after seeing someone. Even if presented with lots of opposing evidence, we tend to rely on our own initial impressions of people.

Why do first impressions not matter? ›

Worrying about first impressions creates a zero-sum mindset.

It can lead us to not be a cheerleader for others and cause us to do things we think are wrong to get what we want. Seeing first meetings as opportunities to grow gives us energy, curiosity, and courage no matter the outcome.

What is first impression essay? ›

First Impression Essay: First impressions are everything. They can make or break a person, company, service or product. That's why it is so important to make a good first impression. Furthermore, a person's first impression can sway a person's opinion with respect to their professional as well as their personal life.

What is your impression? ›

Your impression of someone or something is what you think they are like.

How do you write an impression essay? ›

How to Create a Dominant Impression in Your Writing
  1. Know your purpose as a writer. In other words, choose a point of view that you want to convey.
  2. Select a thesis statement. ...
  3. Choose your words carefully. ...
  4. Focus on sensory details. ...
  5. Edit for consistency.
26 Aug 2021

What is a good sentence for impression? ›

Example Sentences

The candidate made a favorable impression. My first impression of him was that he was a kind and thoughtful young man. First impressions are important but can be misleading. In her journal, she recorded her impressions of the city.

What are good impressions? ›

to make a good impression: to impress; to create a good feeling, to give people a good opinion. idiom. Susie made a very good impression on Bruno when they first met. He was talking about how great she is for days after.

What are the three types of impression? ›

Types of Impression Material
  • Light body-is the easiest-flowing material to flow.
  • Regular body-is slightly thicker than the light body form.
  • Heavy body –is the thickest of the three forms.
27 Feb 2019

How can I make my impression better? ›

6 ways to improve your impression share
  1. Increase your budget.
  2. Refine your keyword list.
  3. Revisit your targeting.
  4. Promote your most popular products and services.
  5. Review your ad copy.
  6. Understand (and improve) your Quality Score.
9 Jun 2021

What is the most important factor in first impressions? ›

General Factors Affecting First Impressions

Body language is many times more relevant than the words we utter. People, whether consciously aware of it or not, generally prefer others who are similar to themselves in look, personality, attitude, belief and behavior.

What are your impressions of someone? ›

Your impression of a person or thing is what you think they are like, usually after having seen or heard them.

What should be the first impression on a girl? ›

How to Create a Lasting Impression on Women
  • Compliment Her. When it comes to compliments, women can be pretty perceptive. ...
  • Respect Her. When it comes to women, you cannot afford to be an insensitive chauvinist. ...
  • Be a Good Listener. ...
  • Be Yourself. ...
  • Be an Opinionated Person.
14 Aug 2012

Is the first impression you have of someone always correct? ›

In sum, first impressions aren't always accurate. Based off of first impressions and looking back on some people you've met, how often do you perceive the person you know now in a completely different light than the way you did when you initially met him or her?

What does impressions mean on face? ›

What are impressions? Impressions on Facebook tell you how many times your content was displayed on a screen. For example, if your ad was displayed on one user's phone screen, then again when the same user browsed Facebook on their desktop, both of those instances would be counted as an impression.

What 5 qualities make a great first impression? ›

How to Create a Good First Impression
  • Be on Time. Someone you are meeting for the first time will not be interested in your "good excuse" for running late. ...
  • Present Yourself Appropriately. ...
  • Be Yourself. ...
  • Have a Winning Smile! ...
  • Be Open and Confident. ...
  • Use Small Talk. ...
  • Be Positive. ...
  • Be Courteous and Attentive.

Do first impressions really matter? ›

First impressions are crucial. They can make or break an opportunity. It's human nature to make a judgement about someone when you first meet them, but did you know that people can formulate an opinion about you in less than 20 seconds!

Should you trust your first impression? ›

“I would never give anyone a blanket statement that they should trust their first impressions, or not,” says Tufts psychologist Nalini Ambady. “That's too dependent on the person, the context of the first impression, everything.” In other words, be wary of first impressions.

Can we trust our first impression of a person Why or why not? ›

'Research has found that first impressions are surprisingly valid,' says Daniel Kahneman, psychologist, Nobel laureate and author of Thinking, Fast And Slow. 'You can predict very quickly whether you like a person and if others will.

Videos

1. Should you trust your first impression? - Peter Mende-Siedlecki
(TED-Ed)
2. First Impressions: Exposure to Violence and a Child's Developing Brain
(CWAVUSA1)
3. Alexander Todorov - Face Value: The Irresistible Influence of First Impressions
(The Brainwaves Video Anthology)
4. Jim Carrey - Celebrity Impressions/Faces (Unatural Act)
(LightsCameraAction)
5. 3 AWFUL Habits That Destroy First Impressions
(Charisma on Command)
6. First impressions based on faces & looks are inherently flawed, Based on biases we develop over time
(counting thoughtz)
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